Does necrotic tissue spread?

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asked Aug 29, 2022 in Other- Health by Zrunmbley (1,060 points)
Does necrotic tissue spread?

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answered Sep 15, 2022 by Gingervitis (23,640 points)
Necrotic tissue does spread and when necrotic tissue spreads it usually spreads quickly.

The affected area may also spread from the infection point quickly, sometimes spreading at a rate of an inch an hour.

If NF progresses to show advanced symptoms, the person will continue to have a very high fever (over 104 degrees Fahrenheit) or may become hypothermic (low temperature) and become dehydrated.

When a tumor becomes necrotic it leads to the release of intracellular components to the tumor microenvironment.

And a high level of potassium is released from necrotic tumor cells.

Several options are available to successfully treat radionecrosis, including: Surgery – Necrotic tissue is surgically removed to help restore blood flow and promote healing.

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment – Pure oxygen is delivered throughout the body to support the healing process.

The difference between necrosis and gangrene is that necrosis usually refers to a small area of the skins tissue dying while gangrene is when larger areas of the tissue die.

Gangrene and necrosis are the same thing other than the size of the area affected.

The first signs of necrosis are warmth, pain, skin redness and swelling at the wound and especially if the redness is spreading rapidly or quickly.

Other signs of necrosis are skin blisters and a crackling sensation under the skin and pain from a skin wound that also has signs of a more severe infection such as chills and fever.

You may also notice grayish, smelly liquid draining from the wound.

Necrosis is caused by diseases, infections and injuries from a lack of blood flow to your tissues and extreme environmental conditions that can cause necrosis.

And while dead body tissue can be removed it can't be brought back to good health once it has died.

A necrotic wound is a wound that has dead tissue due to injury or disease.

Necrotic does mean dead as Necrotic refers to dead body tissue.

When body tissue dies it's called Necrosis.

Necrosis occurs when too little of blood flows to the body's tissue and this can be a result of chemicals, radiation or even injury.

Necrotic tissue is skin necrosis, in which many cells die in the same organ.

It is considered to be a damaging health condition, as it can result in serious diseases like skin cancer.

Necrosis is the death of cells in living tissue caused by external factors such as infection, trauma, or toxins.

As opposed to apoptosis, which is naturally occurring and often beneficial planned cell death, necrosis is almost always detrimental to the health of the patient and can be fatal.

Necrosis can occur due to injuries, infections or diseases.

Lack of blood flow to your tissues and extreme environmental conditions can also cause necrosis.

While dead body tissue can be removed, it can't be brought back to good health.

While apoptosis often provides beneficial effects to the organism, necrosis is almost always detrimental and can be fatal.

Treatment can slow the progress of avascular necrosis, but there is no cure.

Most people who have avascular necrosis eventually have surgery, including joint replacement.

People who have avascular necrosis can also develop severe osteoarthritis.

The affected area may also spread from the infection point quickly, sometimes spreading at a rate of an inch an hour.

If NF progresses to show advanced symptoms, the patient will continue to have a very high fever (over 104 degrees Fahrenheit) or may become hypothermic (low temperature) and become dehydrated.

Since necrotic tissue can also harbor pathogenic organisms, it can lead to infection if left unchecked.

As a result, it is often necessary for the dead tissue to be removed before proper healing can begin.

The process of removing necrotic (dead) tissue is known as debridement.

Necrosis begins with cell swelling, the chromatin gets digested, the plasma and organelle membranes are disrupted, the ER vacuolizes, the organelles break down completely and finally the cell lyses, spewing its intracellular content and eliciting an immune response (inflammation).

In addition to liquefactive and coagulative necrosis, the other morphological patterns associated with cell death by necrosis are: Caseous Necrosis. Fat Necrosis. Gangrenous Necrosis.

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