Does eosinophilic pneumonia go away?

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asked Feb 22 in Diseases Conditions by Critterville (1,920 points)
Does eosinophilic pneumonia go away?

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answered Mar 4 by 1961waggy (20,210 points)
Eosinophilic pneumonia does tend to go away even without treatment but if it does not go away then you may need a corticosteroid such as prednisone.

The symptoms of eosinophilic pneumonia include a cough, fever, dyspnea, night sweats and follows a rapid course with the symptoms developing within 2 weeks.

Also myalgias and pleuritic chest pain with dyspnea can also be present which can then progress to respiratory failure.

People with eosinophilic pneumonia respond rapidly to prednisone at a dose of 30-40 mg/d, with significant symptom improvement occurring within 48 hours and radiographic clearing occurring within 10 days.

Eosinophilic pneumonia is also treated through high doses of corticosteroids which are prescribed for around 2 weeks.

Common symptoms of eosinophilic pneumonia include a cough, fever, dyspnea, night sweats.

Acute eosinophilic pneumonia follows a rapid course with symptoms developing within two weeks.

Myalgias and pleuritic chest pain with dyspnea may also be present, which can progress to respiratory failure.

The treatment for chronic eosinophilic pneumonia is 1 month.

Eosinophilic pneumonia may be mild, and people with the disease may get better without treatment.

For acute eosinophilic pneumonia, a corticosteroid such as prednisone is usually needed.

In chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, prednisone may be needed for many months or even years.

The diagnostic criteria for eosinophilic pneumonia includes 1) acute onset of febrile respiratory manifestations (≤1 month duration before consultation); 2) bilateral diffuse opacities on chest radiography; 3) hypoxemia, with PaO2 on room air<60 mm Hg, and/or PaO2/FiO2≤300 mm Hg, and/or oxygen.

Recovering from eosinophilic pneumonia takes around 1 month for most people for full recovery.

Doctors will usually also give corticosteroids to reduce symptoms and to help reduce inflammation.

Eosinophilic pneumonia is very rare and only accounts for approximately 2.5% of interstitial lung diseases.

It is idiopathic and can occur in any age group but is rarely observed in child.

The parasite that causes eosinophilic pneumonia is paragonimus, the lung fluke.

Helminthic infections are the most common parasitic diseases that produce eosinophilia.

Nematode infections account for the majority of patients with eosinophilia in tropical countries, especially in areas where filariasis, ascariasis and hookworm infection are endemic.

Eosinophilic pneumonia is a group of rare infections that affects the lungs.

A type of white blood cell builds up in the lungs and blood, causing inflammation and damage.

Causes include smoking, allergic reactions and parasitic infections.

Eosinophilia is associated with many disorders, limiting its usefulness as a diagnostic tool in screening expatriates for parasite infections.

In addition, only tissue-invasive helminthic parasites cause eosinophilia, which limits its general application as a screening tool for parasitic infections.

Eosinophilic pneumonia is a group of disorders that is characterized by an accumulation of eosinophilic infiltrates in the pulmonary parenchyma with or without peripheral blood eosinophilia.

These include a broad range of lung conditions that occur due to infectious or non-infectious causes.

Acute eosinophilic pneumonia: This type worsens quickly as your blood oxygen level falls.

Most people with AEP completely recover with treatment.

Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia: This type worsens slowly, over days or weeks.

If untreated, it may persist over weeks or months and result in severe symptoms.

Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is a rare disorder, accounting for approximately 2.5% of interstitial lung diseases.

It is idiopathic and can occur in any age group but is rarely observed in child.

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