Does von Willebrand disease cause joint pain?

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asked Jan 30 in Diseases Conditions by DaviPotter (1,260 points)
Does von Willebrand disease cause joint pain?

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answered Jan 30 by yellowbeannie (10,300 points)
Von Willebrand disease does sometimes cause joint pain.

Von Willebrand disease can cause pain as well as swelling and anemia.

Von Willebrand comes from genetics as almost all cases of von Willebrand disease is passed down or inherited from a parent to a child.

The von Willebrand diseae can be passed down from either the father or mother or both to the child.

A high von Willebrand Factor means an increase in the risk of first Ischemic Stroke an Influence of ADAMTS13, Inflammation, and Genetic Variability.

1 percent of the general world population has von Willebrand disease.

Women are more likely to have von Willebrand than men because of the increased bleeding it causes during a woman's menstrual period, after childbirth and during pregnancy.

Getting the blood test results for von Willebrand can take up to 7 days or a week although in some cases the blood test results may come back within 4 to 5 days.

The life expectancy for von WIllebrand disease is the same as a person without von Willebrand disease.

Type 1 and type 2 Von Willebrand disease does not affect a persons day to day life or life expectancy and most people with Von Willebrand disease live a normal life expectancy.

When you have von Willebrand disease it makes you bleed more easily than you normally would and you have a low level of a substance called von Willebrand factor in your blood or it does not work very well which helps blood cells stick together when you bleed.

Someone gets von Willebrand disease by genetic changes which are almost always inherited and passed down from parent to a child.

The person's genes provide instructions on how to make proteins like the von Willebrand factor protein.

Most people who have von Willebrand disease are born with the condition.

Von Willebrand disease is not life threatening in itself although it can lead to uncontrollable bleeding which can become life threatening.

Other complications of von Willebrand disease can also include Anemia.

Von Willebrand does make you tired in some cases although not everyone feels tired or fatigued with von Willebrand disease.

Von Willebrand disease is not an autoimmune disease although it can be considered an autoimmune disorder in rare cases.

However acquired versions of the Von Willebrand disease usually develop as a result of other autoimmune conditions, medications or diseases.

Von Willebrand disease is not the same as hemophilia although they are both bleeding disorders.

Von Willebrand disease affects men and women equally and hemophillia is more commen in men.

Hemophilia A and B, which occur when the body doesn't create the right proteins to help blood clot.

Von Willebrand disease, which occurs when a protein called the von Willebrand factor is missing or doesn't work.

Foods that should be avoided with von Willebrand disease are high saturated fats, high-fat oils, and high-calorie foods.

For the best possible results, regulate your intake of processed foods, alcohol, artificial sweeteners.

It is generally recommended to stick to a diet rich in whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low in fats, added sugars and salt (sodium).

Gradual changes in eating habits can lead to long-term positive results.

Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption was associated with lower levels of fibrinogen, plasma viscosity, von Willebrand factor, and factor VII.

If you have von Willebrand disease (VWD), you can take steps to prevent bleeding and stay healthy.

For example, avoid over-the-counter medicines that can affect blood clotting, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Always check with your doctor before taking any medicines.

You can have surgery with von Willebrand disease although when possible any major surgery in people with von Willebrand disease should be done in a center with a hematologist with expertise in management of bleeding disorders and access to laboratory testing continuously.

The age at which Von Willebrand disease is diagnosed between the ages of 10 to 12 years of age.

Rarely, von Willebrand disease can develop later in life in people who didn't inherit an affected gene from a parent.

This is known as acquired von Willebrand syndrome, and it's likely caused by an underlying medical condition.

Von Willebrand's is diagnosed by asking you questions about your personal and family histories of bleeding and also by checking for signs of recent bleeding or unusual bleeding and through blood tests that measure how your blood clots.

Von Willebrand disease is not considered a rare disease as it's actually the most common bleeding disorder that is found in up to 1 percent of the U.S. population.

For around 3.2 million or around 1 in every 100 people in the United States have Von Willebrand disease.

Von Willebrand disease affects 1% of the U.S. population and is the most common bleeding disorder in the United States.

Globally, von Willebrand disease affects an estimated 23 to 110 in 1 million people.

Von Willebrand factor helps blood cells stick together (clot) when you bleed.

If there's not enough of it or it does not work properly, it takes longer for bleeding to stop.

There's currently no cure for VWD, but it does not usually cause serious problems and most people with it can live normal,active lives.

Type 1 and type 2 Von Willebrand Disease does not affect day-to-day life or life expectancy.

People need to anticipate when problems could occur (surgery, dental procedures, menstruation, traumatic injury) and follow their doctor's advice on what to do in these situations.

Von Willebrand disease is a lifelong bleeding disorder in which your blood doesn't clot properly.

People with the disease have low levels of von Willebrand factor, a protein that helps blood clot, or the protein doesn't perform as it should.

Von Willebrand factor helps blood cells stick together (clot) when you bleed.

If there's not enough of it or it does not work properly, it takes longer for bleeding to stop.

There's currently no cure for VWD, but it does not usually cause serious problems and most people with it can live normal, active lives.

Von Willebrand disease is a bleeding disorder that slows the blood clotting process , causing prolonged bleeding after an injury.
Von Willebrand disease is often inherited, but in rare cases, it may develop later in life.

Symptoms of Von Willebrand disease may include recurrent and prolonged nosebleeds, bleeding from the gums, increased menstrual flow, and excessive bleeding from a cut.

Treatment for Von WIllebrand disease focuses on stopping or preventing bleeding episodes, typically by using medications.

People with this condition often experience easy bruising, long-lasting nosebleeds, and excessive bleeding or oozing following an injury, surgery, or dental work.

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