Why not cut switchbacks?

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asked Jul 18, 2023 in General Travel by Vasylevis (1,490 points)
Why not cut switchbacks?

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answered Dec 22, 2023 by Alexxa12901 (7,850 points)
The reason to not cut switchbacks is because cutting switchbacks and shortcuts and new paths exacerbates erosion of the trail and because the shortcuts tend to run up and down instead of horizontally like the switchback it ends up creating more massive gullies.

Switchbacks are hard especially for beginners and those who never road or driven switchbacks.

Uphill switchback roads or trails are harder than downhill switchbacks or trails but with enough practice the switchbacks usually become easier to go up and down on.

To ride a tight uphill switchback you will need to take it slow and slowly move the handlebars of the bicycle or dirt bike etc into the turns and continue taking it slow but pedal hard enough or increase the throttle on a dirt bike to get up the hill.

Just be careful about slipping and if you go to fast you could crash.

If it gets too hard to ride the bicycle up the tight uphill switch back you may have to get off the bicycle and push it up the hill.

A tight switchback is a road or trail that has a turn that's too tight for the front and rear wheel to take the same line.

A switchback is a road which goes up a steep hill in a series of sharp bends, or a sharp bend in a road.

Switchback roads can look like hair pins or ZigZag and have many twist and turns to them.

Basically switch back roads or trails are a zigzag road, trail, or section of railroad tracks for climbing a steep hill.

A switchback is a curve that completely reverses the direction of a road.

The switchback roads are typically used in steep topography where the ground slope between two control points is greater than the allowable grade of the road.

A switchback lengthens road to allow more gain in elevation while maintaining the allowable grade.

In the U.S., we call the mountainous roads "switchback" roads, with the individual turns called "hairpin" turns.

In contrast to monotonously straight desert highways, Lombard Street, in San Francisco, incorporates eight hairpin turns in one quarter-mile block, making it what locals call the “world's crookedest road”.

If you see a road on a map that is in a ZigZag fashion then it's a mountain road or switchback road that can be hard to navigate especially if you've never driven or ridden on the switch back roads.

You have to drive slower and be more cautious on a switchback road than you would on a straight or less curvy road.

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