What are the first signs of a bad heart?

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asked Apr 24, 2023 in Diseases Conditions by Dgoolittle (1,440 points)
What are the first signs of a bad heart?

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answered Apr 24, 2023 by Ratpleased (2,980 points)
The first signs of a bad heart and heart failure are trouble breathing and trouble breathing when walking or exercising as well as an irregular heartbeat, swollen legs, neck veins that stick out and sounds from fluid that is built up in the lungs.

A doctor can test for heart failure through an echocardiogram test which is the best test to diagnose heart failure.

The 4 signs your heart is quietly failing are rapid or irregular heartbeat, swelling in the feet, ankles and legs, weakness and fatigue and shortness of breath when laying down or with activity.

3 early warning signs your heart is failing include.

Swelling in the legs, feet and ankles.
Fatigue and weakness.
Shortness of breath when laying down or with activity.

Other signs your heart is failing are wheezing, cough that doesn't go away or a cough that brings up some white or pink colored mucus with spots of blood, reduced ability to exercise or climb stairs and a rapid or irregular heartbeat.

Heart failure does cause pale skin as well as cold hands or feet as well as sometimes frequent urination at night.

People who are having a heart attack often have a sense of impending doom, look pale and sickly, and break out in sweats.

Many have difficulties breathing, feel nauseous or vomit.

These symptoms may be much more noticeable than the chest pain.

Heart failure and congestive heart failure are the same thing as congestive heart failure is also the medical term for heart failure.

Heart failure or congestive heart failure occurs when your heart muscle does not pump the blood as well as it should and when this occurs the blood will often back up and fluid can then build up in your lungs and lead to shortness of breath and even death if not treated promptly.

Dying of congestive heart failure is sometimes painful although not always.

Some people dying of congestive heart failure during the final stage may experience some pain or discomfort while dying and others may not experience any pain at all.

To treat pain in patients with congestive heart failure non opioids and opioids can be used such as paracetamol.

People who are getting or have congestive heart failure may experience symptoms such as Irregular or Rapid Heart Beats, Weakness, Fatigue, Dizziness, Water and Fluid Retention, white or pink blood-tinged phlegm, wheezing, Persistent Cough, shortness of breath and a reduce in your ability to exercise.

Another sign of congestive heart failure is swelling of your hands, feet, ankles and legs as well as congestion of your lungs due to fluid backing up into your lungs.

If you or someone are experiencing any of those symptoms then it could be a sign that congestive heart failure is coming or you or someone already has congestive heart failure.

So get to a doctor or the emergency room if you think you or someone may be having or has congestive heart failure.

When you have something wrong with your heart they'll usually be signs to look for that can mean you have heart problems.

Common signs and symptoms of heart problems include chest pain, chest tightness, chest pressure and chest discomfort (angina) Shortness of breath.

Pain, numbness, weakness or coldness in your legs or arms if the blood vessels in those parts of your body are narrowed.

Pain in the neck, jaw, throat, upper abdomen or back.

The best way to strengthen a weak heart muscle is to eat healthy and eat foods such as oats and other foods high in fiber.

Also exercise is a good way to strengthen a weak heart muscle and to help keep your heart strong and healthy as well.

Brisk walking, running, swimming, cycling, playing tennis and jumping rope.

Heart-pumping aerobic exercise is the kind that doctors have in mind when they recommend at least 150 minutes per week of moderate activity.

The signs of an unhealthy heart are chest pain, chest tightness, chest pressure and chest discomfort (angina) Shortness of breath.

Pain, numbness, weakness or coldness in your legs or arms if the blood vessels in those parts of your body are narrowed.

Pain in the neck, jaw, throat, upper abdomen or back.

The closing and opening of the heart valves is what causes the sound of the heartbeat.

The familiar 'lub-dub' sound of the heartbeat is caused by the rhythmic closing of the heart valves as blood is pumped in and out of the chambers.

A heart murmur is a sound caused by blood flow within the heart.

The difference between the bell and the diaphragm of a stethoscope is in the shape of the ends and the sound frequencies they are used to listen too.

The bell of the stethoscope is used to listen to low frequency sounds while the diaphragm of the stethoscope is used to listen to higher frequency sounds.

The diaphragm part of the stethoscope is the circular end of the chest piece of the stethoscope and is used for listening to higher frequency sounds.

On two-sided chest pieces of the stethoscope, the diaphragm is the larger of the two ends. Its larger size allows the user to listen to a bigger area of the patient's body.

The diaphragm is designed to pick up sounds with higher frequencies compared to the bell.

Using the bell part of the stethoscope is better for taking blood pressure with.

The bell side of the stethoscope is better for blood pressure.

The bell of the stethoscope is suggested because it is used for low-pitched sounds like blood pressure.

To check if your heart is healthy you can use a stethoscope and also have your heart rate checked.

Your heart rate should normally range between 60 to 100 beats per minute, although many doctors prefer their patients to be in the 50 to 70-beat range.

If you train regularly, your per-minute heart rate may be as low as 40, which typically indicates excellent physical condition.

A heartbeat should sound like a lub and a dup sound.

A normal heartbeat has two sounds, a lub (sometimes called S1) and a dub (S2).

These sounds are caused by the closing of valves inside your heart.

If there are problems in your heart, there may be additional or abnormal sounds.

Normally, two distinct sounds are heard through the stethoscope: a low, slightly prolonged “lub” (first sound) occurring at the beginning of ventricular contraction, or systole, and produced by closure of the mitral and tricuspid valves, and a sharper, higher-pitched “dup” (second sound).

When listening for heart sounds you use the bell of the stethoscope.

The bell of the stethoscope is used for listening to low frequency sounds while the diaphragm of the stethoscope is used for listening to higher frequency sounds.

The bell is best for detecting lower pitch sounds, like some heart murmurs, and some bowel sounds.

It is used for the detection of bruits, and for heart sounds (for a cardiac exam, you should listen with the diaphragm, and repeat with the bell).

The reason a stethoscope has two different sides for listening is one side of the stethoscope is used to listen to low frequency sounds and the other side of the stethoscope is used to listen to high frequency sounds.

The bell end of the stethoscope is the end of the stethoscope that is used to listen to low frequency sounds.

The other side of the stethoscope which is the diaphragm is used to listen higher frequency sounds.

Most times doctors use the larger part of the stethoscope to listen to your stomach and heart and the smaller side of the stethoscope to listen to your wrist and pulse when taking your blood pressure.

So one side of the stethoscope lets you listen to higher frequency sounds such as the heart and the other side lets you listen to lower frequency sounds such as your pulse.

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