How do doctors pronounce a patient dead?

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asked Apr 7, 2023 in Other- Health by QyVesper (300 points)
How do doctors pronounce a patient dead?

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answered Apr 7, 2023 by basicduty (2,060 points)
Doctors pronounce a patient dead through various ways which include testing for reaction to verbal and or tactile stimulation and checking their eyes.

No pupillary light reflex when a light is pointed into their eyes and the pupils will be fixed and dilated and breathing and lung sounds will also be absent.

Another way doctors check for and pronounce a patient dead is checking their carotid pulse and when they are dead they will have no carotid pulse or any pulse at all.

To pronounce a patient dead you place a stethoscope on the chest and note the lack of breathing and heart sounds.

Place a finger on the carotid artery and note the lack of pulse.

Look at the clock. Pronounce the patient dead at the given time.

Your pulse can be weaker on one side of your neck due to variations in the positioning of the carotid artery.

The second leading branch of your aorta which is the left carotid artery directly comes off the aorta.

It can be normal to have a pulse weaker on one side of your neck.

A weak carotid pulse means that it's an indication of critical aortic stenosis which warrants urgent attention.

The carotid pulse is the pulse from the carotid arteries which take oxygenated blood from your heart to the brain.

The carotid pulse from the carotid arteries can be felt on either side of your neck just below the angle of your jaw.

The rhythmic beat is caused by varying volumes of blood that are being pushed out of your heart and toward your extremities.

To check the carotid pulse you put the tip of your index and long finger in the groove of your neck along your windpipe which allows you to feel the pulse in your carotid artery.

The carotid pulse is on the left or right and you can take your carotid pulse on either side of your neck.

To feel the carotid pulse you put the tip of your index and long finger in the groove of your neck along your windpipe which allows you to feel the pulse in your carotid artery.

The symptoms of a restricted carotid artery include blurred vision or vision loss, confusion, memory loss, numbness or weakness in part of your body or on one side of your body and problems with speech, memory, reasoning and problems with thinking.

A sluggish carotid artery can be caused by atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries.

The atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries can lead to a buildup of fatty deposits called plaque which can slowly squeeze the artery closed which reduces blood flow and makes the carotid artery sluggish.

The carotid artery is located on both sides of your neck.

You have a pair of carotid arteries which are a pair of blood vessels on both sides of your neck which deliver the blood to your head and brain.

The most common cause of carotid artery disease is Atherosclerosis.

The Atherosclerosis condition causes fatty deposits to build up along the inner layer of your arteries which forms plaque.

And the thickening narrows the arteries and decreases the blood flow or even completely blocks the flow of blood to your brain.

A normal carotid artery reading is 30-40 cm/sec although the velocity scale setting should be adjusted for each patient.

In healthy adults, the flow ratio between the two common carotid arteries is 1.07 ± 0.052.

A blocked carotid artery can be caused by.
Trauma to the neck.
Smoking or using recreational drugs or drinking alcohol.
Older age and high blood pressure, high triglycerides, high cholesterol.
Family history of stroke or diabetes melitus.
Eating greasy and fatty foods or too much processed foods.

The Carotid artery disease is caused by buildup of plaque in your arteries that deliver blood to your brain.

The percentage of carotid artery blockage that requires surgery is more than 70 percent.

When a carotid artery gets blocked to more than 70 percent and is narrowed more than 70 percent then surgery is needed.

The warning signs of a blocked carotid artery are.

Problems with memory, speech, reasoning and thinking.
Memory loss and confusion.
Numbness and or weakness in part of your body or on one side of the body.
Vision loss or blurred vision.

Foods that cause plaque in the carotid artery are red meat, dairy products, eggs, cheese, processed meats and foods high in choline and saturated fat.

These foods increase the number of metabolites which build plaque in the arteries.

To get rid of plaque in your neck arteries you can have a surgery called carotid endarterectomy.

The carotid endarterectomy is done by making an incision along the front of your neck which opens the carotid artery and removes the plaque.

You can also help remove plaque from your neck arteries and your other arteries by eating foods that are good for reducing plaque in the arteries.

A change in diet can reverse plaque in arteries and also cleanses out and prevent plaque buildup in the arteries.

Good foods to eat that help reverse plaque in the arteries are tomatoes, berries, raspberries, blackberries, cranberries, blueberries and strawberries.

Other foods that are good for reducing plaque buildup in the arteries are fish, beans, leafy greens, Cruciferous vegetables, citrus fruits, oranges and onions.

Aspirin can and does reduce plaque in the arteries as aspirin helps to thin the blood which reduces risk of blocked arteries and plaque rupture.

Taking a daily aspirin can help to reduce the risk of stroke, blood clot and heart attack.

The supplement that removes plaque from the arteries are Omega-3 fish oil supplements which also help to reduce plaque buildup in the arteries and lower your risk of stroke, heart disease, blood clots and heart attacks.

Statins do dissolve the plaque in the arteries by lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol which is known as bad cholesterol in your blood.

They help to draw out cholesterol from the plaque and stabilize the plaque.

Exercise can help to unclog arteries and remove plaque buildup in the arteries.

Daily exercise can also prevent arteries from clogging up and prevent plaque build up in the arteries as the exercise keeps your blood flowing.

Changes in your lifestyle which include stopping smoking, managing stress, exercise and eating a healthy diet can help unclog arteries and reduce the size of atherosclerotic plaques.

Plaque in your arteries is made up of deposits of fatty substances, cholesterol, cellular waste products, calcium, and fibrin.

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