What foods react badly with metformin?

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asked Aug 12 in Other- Health by Herrodi (1,180 points)
What foods react badly with metformin?

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answered Aug 30 by Q766s (8,800 points)
Foods that can react badly with metformin include high sugar foods, sugary foods and foods such as white bread, white rice, white pasta, candy, soda, desserts, and snacks like chips or crackers.

The most common side effect of metformin is nausea as well as diarrhea and vomiting.

Usually though the side effects from taking metformin go away over time.

You can stay on metformin for as long as you need too and most people stay on metformin long term or for life.

However taking metformin can cause vitamin B12 deficiency if you take it for a long time.

This can make you feel very tired, breathless and faint, so your doctor may check the vitamin B12 level in your blood.

You can take metformin and Trulicity together and they can be even more effective that way.

Studies, such as the AWARD-10 Study, have shown that when Trulicity is combined with metformin and an SGLT-2 inhibitor, that it can be an effective and well-tolerated medication for people with Type 2 diabetes.

Trulicity is not a type of insulin but instead Trulicity is a medication that helps your body produce the natural insulin it should already be producing.

Ozempic is slightly better than Trulicity which was found out in a study done.

In a phase 3b clinical trial, called SUSTAIN 7, comparing Ozempic against Trulicity, Ozempic was found to be slightly better in terms of improving blood sugar control and resulting in weight loss, with a similar safety profile.

Trulicity and Ozempic are the same thing but just with different brand names.

The Trulicity and Ozempic are brand names for the same drug called Semaglutide.

Trulicity is a non-insulin option that helps your body release the insulin it's already making.

Trulicity has been proven to lower blood sugar levels.

People taking Trulicity may notice better blood sugar numbers before eating in the morning (fasting blood sugar).

Trulicity is actually not a type of Insulin but instead Trulicity helps your body release the natural insulin your body produces.

Trulicity is not an insulin.

Instead Trulicity works to help your body release natural insulin as your body should.

Trulicity actually mimics the effects of GLP-1 a naturally occurring hormone that stimulates insulin secretion.

Trulicity is only suitable for people with type 2 diabetes who still have functioning insulin-producing cells in their pancreas.

Trulicity helps your body release the insulin it's already making.

 In studies, Trulicity has been proven to lower blood sugar levels.

People taking Trulicity may notice better blood sugar numbers before eating in the morning (fasting blood sugar).

The half-life of Trulicity is about 5 days.

(This means it takes about 5 days for your body to get rid of half of a dose of Trulicity.)

Typically, it takes about 5 half-lives for a drug to leave your system.

So Trulicity will stay in your system for about 25 days after your last dose.

Trulicity can be used with insulin.

The dosage of insulin may need to be reduced.

The combination of Trulicity and insulin increases the risk of low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia)

Trulicity increases satiety, slows stomach emptying, and increases your body's insulin production.

Metformin generally helps modulate and smooth out your blood sugar levels (by decreasing glucose production in the liver, among other things).

Clinical studies show that Trulicity is just as effective at lowering Hgb-A1C as Bydureon (exenatide) and Victoza (liraglutide).

It's even equivalent to Januvia (sitagliptin) and metformin (Glucophage), other commonly prescribed diabetes drugs, in terms of lowering A1C levels.

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